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of world boston. as we head into the pam assessing the aftermath of the arab spring, allow me to thank todd, president and ceo of the world affairs councils of america, his crack staff, national council chair, laurie murray, and our many sponsors for this significantly stimulating conference thus far. [applause] like america, i am a wash in debt. it's time to make good on those obligations to each here on the panel who i'm honored to present. i had the pleasure of hearing at dozens of universities in the boston area. i'm owing you a way overdue invitation to the council downtown. professor is a senior fellow at the saban center at brookings institution, a distinguished former and current adviser to government agencies, u.s. leaders, and diplomats, and he's a prolific and best-selling author. i'll quote from the top of the website at the university of maryland where he is the professor of peace and development. i have always believed that good scholarship can be relevant and consequential for public policy. it is possible to effect public policy without being an advocate, to be passionate ab
since then, they make more u-turns than a boston cab driver trying to get to the place where he was. when you look at the results of this election come you can try connect connection between policies president obama has led on a devoted support he got. if in the face republicans decide what they need to do is go back and do it even more conservative again, far be it for me to persuade them otherwise. we got another election in four years. i can levitate, but it wouldn't be wise. >> on the religion question i agree was blaise entry into. if you look at the polling of people less likely to vote for a candidate because they were more men, the majority of his people thought barack obama is a muslim who was born in canada country in kenya. it wasn't there to make it a negative, but it is true democrats did not make it an issue. >> some of the positions from me to turn the primaries really hurt specifically with regard to immigration reform. it is newt gingrich is that romney was the most conservative on that issue in any country where it is the fastest-growing bloc of voters, that's real
here. >> hike in the stephen flynn from northeastern university in boston. on the issue of new normal, i wonder picking up on david's point about the price to post-9/11, is the sort of coming to grips with the hubris we could prevent bad things from happening, this huge investment in the post-secular world arabic ere we could ideally stop risk. actually coping with that is what we really need to increase and maybe just bring it very close to home. we just had this bashing mother nature in the area, priced at around $60 billion for a risk above the basic things like when you have tunnels that are only seven feet above water. it fills up the hole and you end up with 86 million gallons of oil in the tunnel and that's not hard to predict. putting safeguards in place in recovering this may be one element of this. basically the issue is that we focus too much on trying to prevent risk instead of managing it better? >> steve tried to argue for solace, which is an interesting concept. yes, back here. >> richard downey from the center for hemispheric u.s. david, you mentioned in the election t
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3